MorClick – Satellite internet that changes lives

The South African government is focused on providing improved service delivery in underserved and unserved areas of South Africa.

However, it cannot achieve this without reliable internet connectivity, and a recent poll on MyBroadband found that 40% of remote solutions providers do not have access to fibre.

Many of these providers therefore do not offer their services in remote areas at all, due to this lack of internet connectivity.

Satellite internet is the solution

Leading rural connectivity provider MorClick believes that satellite internet is the solution to South Africa’s connectivity issues in rural areas.

“Satellite communications can help infrastructure upliftment projects in areas that cellular and fibre connectivity cannot reach,” said Mohamed Hassim, Managing Director of MorClick.

“MorClick’s fast and reliable internet and voice communications services across South Africa open up huge possibilities for remote areas to take advantage of their new assets and fulfil the intentions of their important projects.”

MorClick is also proud to support the government’s programmes to fast-track connectivity across rural South Africa.

The connectivity provider recently spoke with President Cyril Ramaphosa at an annual auction at his Ntaba Nyoni farm in Mpumalanga, where it was supplying free satellite internet to his guests.

Ramaphosa expressed his support of the work satellite connectivity suppliers such as MorClick are doing in rural South Africa.

He highlighted the importance of getting young South Africans involved in the provision and rollout of satellite Internet, indicating that they are passionate about joining this great cause and contributing to the betterment of the nation.

Improving education in rural areas

A great example of satellite internet’s value in rural South Africa is MorClick and YahClick’s partnership to support the work of KHULA Education.

The pair provided three months of free internet to 15 schools in the Isandlwana and Rorke’s Drift regions of KwaZulu-Natal.

This allowed KHULA Education to introduce multimedia learning experiences that, according to the NGO’s director Debbie Heustice, “transformed learning, expanded the capacity to educate, and dramatically improved the quality and effective teaching – literally overnight.”

Teachers could access important resources and connect with pupils via their phones through the internet, and the uncapped connectivity also served as motivation for individuals to donate 150 iPads.

These iPads were then used on a rotational basis, and could be used near schools that had free satellite Wi-Fi to stream lessons and interact with teachers.

“Some principals have even encouraged local university students to use their school Wi-Fi to help them continue their studies online when forced to return to their rural villages when universities closed,” said Heustice.

Satellite connectivity can support many other types of projects in rural South Africa, including providing backup connectivity to hospitals, and keeping the police connected, said MorClick.

See the My Broadband article here.